Proposal for a new major – Biological Anthropology

Anthropologists have made the study of human biology and culture their primary research interest. Wisconsin Lutheran College’s plan of providing an increasingly diverse student body with cross-cultural course subjects and research topics will be further accomplished with a major in biological anthropology.

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Biological anthropology is one of four research branches within the discipline of anthropology. By its nature, it provides students with a wide range of career options. Today, graduates of this field acquire work as laboratory assistants in offices of county coroners, they study human physiology and demography as it is applied to fields such as nursing, medical social work, nutrition and public health. Additionally, students holding degrees in biological anthropology work in contract field archaeology and often have the opportunity to work for Federal and State branches of the Parks Department. These careers are lucrative and often accompany local civic and community concerns.

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Students who choose to pursue graduate degrees in biological anthropology, often combine their undergraduate, academic experiences with research in forensics, criminology, primatology, and cultural resource management. The career paths that often follow from these added specializations and research partnerships allow students to acquire further certification with law enforcement programs and environmental protection agencies (fields which are continually growing in significance and public interest).

forensicsChristians with backgrounds in anthropology have become important to the mission field. Whether they assist in compiling Biblical translations or with the establishment of culturally focused systems of healthcare and education, their contributions have been instrumental in finding new and unique cultural pathways for the conveyance of God’s Good News.

If successfully supported by the WLC academic community and the college’s Board of Regents, a degree in biological anthropology will be offered beginning in the fall semester of 2010.


About The Author

Ned began his ministry in 2006 as an adjunct professor in anthropology. Today he is an assistant professor and splits his time between Wisconsin Lutheran College (WLC) and HOPE School (Milwaukee, Wisconsin). His current goal is to use this split position to bring young people to college and immerse them in a Christian atmosphere where God's creation can be celebrated, and where His plan for humankind can be understood through a closer examination of human biology and culture.

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